In her upcoming book, Volha Charnysh examines the enduring consequences of the resettlement of nearly 20 million Europeans in the aftermath of World War II. The erosion of informal norms and networks in communities where migrants and natives were culturally distant from one another increased the demand for formal state institutions in the provision of public goods and welfare. Greater willingness to engage with the state in communities diversified through forced migration contributed to the accumulation of state capacity over time and paid off in the long run. The book challenges the conventional view that cultural diversity reduces the provision of public goods and erodes institutional quality.